What’s New in Australian Taxation for the 2023 Filing Season

by
Brihasi Dey
Reviewed by
min read
Last updated:

With the end of the current financial year, Australians are eager to comprehend the shifts in taxation policies outlined in the 2023-24 Federal Budget.

Treasurer Jim Chalmers unveiled a budget marked by precision and focus, diverging from the broader tax cuts of previous years. 

In this comprehensive guide, we will discuss the noteworthy alterations, equipping taxpayers with the knowledge needed to prepare for the new tax season.

Key Takeaways of the Australian Federal Budget 2023-2024

The 2023-24 Australian Federal Budget unveils a series of financial plans and policies that are set to influence various sectors of the economy.

Here are some of the key takeaways of the new budget that you must know.

Individual Taxation

One of the headline features of the budget is the preservation of existing personal tax rates and thresholds, providing a sense of stability for individual taxpayers. 

Australians will continue to enjoy tax-free income up to $18,200, with progressive rates applied for higher incomes. 

Notably, the eagerly anticipated Stage 3 tax cuts, slashing the 32.5% marginal tax rate to 30% for incomes between $45,000 and $200,000, are expected to be implemented from July 1, 2024, offering a significant boon for a vast portion of the population.

The Demise of LMITO

In a notable shift, the Low and Middle-Income Tax Offset (LMITO) met its end, leaving a void for individuals earning up to $126,000. 

The absence of LMITO could translate into diminished tax refunds, with low-to-middle-income earners facing potential reductions starting from July 2023. 

Small Business Focus

Amidst the changes, small businesses emerge as focal points of the budget's economic strategy. 

The reinstatement of the $20,000 instant asset write-off serves as a beacon of hope. Small businesses, defined by aggregated annual turnover of less than $10 million, can promptly deduct the entire cost of eligible assets under $20,000, empowering them to invest in essential resources.

Additionally, a novel incentive beckons small businesses towards energy efficiency. A 20% supplementary deduction for qualifying assets promotes investments in energy-efficient fridges, electric cooling systems, batteries, and related technologies. 

This initiative not only fosters sustainable practices but also offers financial relief to conscientious entrepreneurs.

Property Investors

The housing market witnesses transformative incentives aimed at bolstering supply. An accelerated depreciation rate, soaring from 2.5% to 4% per year for eligible new build-to-rent projects, fosters a conducive environment for property developers. 

Simultaneously, a reduction in withholding tax for managed investment trusts (MITs) catalyzes investment in newly constructed residential build-to-rent properties, decreasing the withholding tax from 30% to 15% from July 1, 2024.

The Home Guarantee Scheme undergoes a strategic expansion, opening its doors to a broader spectrum of participants. Former property owners, who have been absent from the property market for the last decade, find themselves re-eligible. 

This inclusivity encourages market re-entry for those who have previously experienced financial crises or relationship breakdowns.

Superannuation

The reduction of tax concessions for superannuation balances above $3 million from July 1, 2025, necessitates strategic financial planning for high-net-worth individuals.

Employers will be mandated to synchronize super guarantee payments with salaries and wages, commencing July 1, 2026. 

Multinational Taxation

Australia is set to implement pivotal aspects of the Pillar Two solution of the OECD/G20 BEPS Project. This implementation signifies that certain large multinationals will be subject to a 15% minimum tax in the jurisdictions where they operate, marking a significant stride towards global tax standardization. 

Furthermore, from 1 July 2024, there will be an expansion in the scope of the general anti-avoidance rules in Pt IVA of ITAA 1936.

In the realm of petroleum taxation, changes are afoot with the petroleum resource rent tax (PRRT). 

A cap on deductible expenditure at 90% of assessable income will be introduced for projects that produce liquefied natural gas, effective from 1 July 2023. Additionally, the definition of “exploration for petroleum” in the PRRT legislation will be amended to align with the government's intent and ATO guidance.

Taxation legislation is also undergoing amendments to realign with the reissued AASB 17: Insurance Contracts, effective for income years beginning from 1 January 2023. 

Taxation and GST for Australians

The Australian government is taking significant steps to alleviate the tax-related administrative burden for small and medium businesses. A notable allocation of funding to the ATO over the next four years aims to cut paperwork and reduce the time small businesses spend on taxes, enhancing operational efficiency.

The GDP adjustment factor for pay-as-you-go and GST instalments is set to be reduced, and additional funding will be channelled to improve the administration of student loans. 

In a bid to address the growth of businesses’ tax and superannuation liabilities, more funding is being allocated, and a temporary lodgment penalty amnesty program will be extended to small businesses.

From 1 July 2025, the Personal Income Tax Compliance Program will be extended for an additional two years and its scope expanded from 1 July 2023. To address emerging risks to GST revenue, funding for GST compliance will be extended for another four years.

Also, the start date for the streamlining of excise administration measures announced in the previous budget will be amended.

What Does It Mean for Your Crypto Taxes?

The 2023-24 Australian Federal Budget and its updated taxation measures are indicative of a dynamic fiscal landscape. For crypto investors, this translates to a period of adaptation and strategic realignment to comply with the tax implications effectively.

In fact, it’s not just about compliance but optimizing tax efficiency to enhance the profitability and sustainability of crypto investments.

As Australians prepare for the forthcoming tax season, leverage Kryptos to stay on top of the latest tax regulations, optimize your crypto investments, and ensure compliance with evolving taxation policies. 

To explore the platform for free, Sign Up Now.

FAQs

1. What are the main changes in the 2023-24 Australian Federal Budget for individual taxpayers?

The budget preserves existing tax rates and thresholds, eliminates LMITO, and announces the implementation of Stage 3 tax cuts from July 1, 2024.

2. How does the new budget affect small businesses in Australia?

Small businesses benefit from the reinstated $20,000 instant asset write-off and a 20% supplementary deduction for energy-efficient assets.

3. What incentives are introduced for property investors in the 2023-24 budget?

The budget introduces an accelerated depreciation rate for build-to-rent projects and reduces withholding tax for managed investment trusts.

4. Are there any changes to superannuation in the 2023-24 Federal Budget?

Tax concessions are reduced for balances above $3 million from July 1, 2025, and employers must sync super payments with salaries from July 1, 2026.

5. How does the new budget impact multinational corporations operating in Australia?

Implementation of OECD/G20 BEPS Project’s Pillar Two solution introduces a 15% minimum tax for certain multinationals from July 1, 2024.

All content on Kryptos serves general informational purposes only. It's not intended to replace any professional advice from licensed accountants, attorneys, or certified financial and tax professionals. The information is completed to the best of our knowledge and we at Kryptos do not claim either correctness or accuracy of the same. Before taking any tax position / stance, you should always consider seeking independent legal, financial, taxation or other advice from the professionals. Kryptos is not liable for any loss caused from the use of, or by placing reliance on, the information on this website. Kryptos disclaims any responsibility for the accuracy or adequacy of any positions taken by you in your tax returns. Thank you for being part of our community, and we're excited to continue guiding you on your crypto journey!

Arrow

What’s New in Australian Taxation for the 2023 Filing Season

By
Brihasi Dey
On

With the end of the current financial year, Australians are eager to comprehend the shifts in taxation policies outlined in the 2023-24 Federal Budget.

Treasurer Jim Chalmers unveiled a budget marked by precision and focus, diverging from the broader tax cuts of previous years. 

In this comprehensive guide, we will discuss the noteworthy alterations, equipping taxpayers with the knowledge needed to prepare for the new tax season.

Key Takeaways of the Australian Federal Budget 2023-2024

The 2023-24 Australian Federal Budget unveils a series of financial plans and policies that are set to influence various sectors of the economy.

Here are some of the key takeaways of the new budget that you must know.

Individual Taxation

One of the headline features of the budget is the preservation of existing personal tax rates and thresholds, providing a sense of stability for individual taxpayers. 

Australians will continue to enjoy tax-free income up to $18,200, with progressive rates applied for higher incomes. 

Notably, the eagerly anticipated Stage 3 tax cuts, slashing the 32.5% marginal tax rate to 30% for incomes between $45,000 and $200,000, are expected to be implemented from July 1, 2024, offering a significant boon for a vast portion of the population.

The Demise of LMITO

In a notable shift, the Low and Middle-Income Tax Offset (LMITO) met its end, leaving a void for individuals earning up to $126,000. 

The absence of LMITO could translate into diminished tax refunds, with low-to-middle-income earners facing potential reductions starting from July 2023. 

Small Business Focus

Amidst the changes, small businesses emerge as focal points of the budget's economic strategy. 

The reinstatement of the $20,000 instant asset write-off serves as a beacon of hope. Small businesses, defined by aggregated annual turnover of less than $10 million, can promptly deduct the entire cost of eligible assets under $20,000, empowering them to invest in essential resources.

Additionally, a novel incentive beckons small businesses towards energy efficiency. A 20% supplementary deduction for qualifying assets promotes investments in energy-efficient fridges, electric cooling systems, batteries, and related technologies. 

This initiative not only fosters sustainable practices but also offers financial relief to conscientious entrepreneurs.

Property Investors

The housing market witnesses transformative incentives aimed at bolstering supply. An accelerated depreciation rate, soaring from 2.5% to 4% per year for eligible new build-to-rent projects, fosters a conducive environment for property developers. 

Simultaneously, a reduction in withholding tax for managed investment trusts (MITs) catalyzes investment in newly constructed residential build-to-rent properties, decreasing the withholding tax from 30% to 15% from July 1, 2024.

The Home Guarantee Scheme undergoes a strategic expansion, opening its doors to a broader spectrum of participants. Former property owners, who have been absent from the property market for the last decade, find themselves re-eligible. 

This inclusivity encourages market re-entry for those who have previously experienced financial crises or relationship breakdowns.

Superannuation

The reduction of tax concessions for superannuation balances above $3 million from July 1, 2025, necessitates strategic financial planning for high-net-worth individuals.

Employers will be mandated to synchronize super guarantee payments with salaries and wages, commencing July 1, 2026. 

Multinational Taxation

Australia is set to implement pivotal aspects of the Pillar Two solution of the OECD/G20 BEPS Project. This implementation signifies that certain large multinationals will be subject to a 15% minimum tax in the jurisdictions where they operate, marking a significant stride towards global tax standardization. 

Furthermore, from 1 July 2024, there will be an expansion in the scope of the general anti-avoidance rules in Pt IVA of ITAA 1936.

In the realm of petroleum taxation, changes are afoot with the petroleum resource rent tax (PRRT). 

A cap on deductible expenditure at 90% of assessable income will be introduced for projects that produce liquefied natural gas, effective from 1 July 2023. Additionally, the definition of “exploration for petroleum” in the PRRT legislation will be amended to align with the government's intent and ATO guidance.

Taxation legislation is also undergoing amendments to realign with the reissued AASB 17: Insurance Contracts, effective for income years beginning from 1 January 2023. 

Taxation and GST for Australians

The Australian government is taking significant steps to alleviate the tax-related administrative burden for small and medium businesses. A notable allocation of funding to the ATO over the next four years aims to cut paperwork and reduce the time small businesses spend on taxes, enhancing operational efficiency.

The GDP adjustment factor for pay-as-you-go and GST instalments is set to be reduced, and additional funding will be channelled to improve the administration of student loans. 

In a bid to address the growth of businesses’ tax and superannuation liabilities, more funding is being allocated, and a temporary lodgment penalty amnesty program will be extended to small businesses.

From 1 July 2025, the Personal Income Tax Compliance Program will be extended for an additional two years and its scope expanded from 1 July 2023. To address emerging risks to GST revenue, funding for GST compliance will be extended for another four years.

Also, the start date for the streamlining of excise administration measures announced in the previous budget will be amended.

What Does It Mean for Your Crypto Taxes?

The 2023-24 Australian Federal Budget and its updated taxation measures are indicative of a dynamic fiscal landscape. For crypto investors, this translates to a period of adaptation and strategic realignment to comply with the tax implications effectively.

In fact, it’s not just about compliance but optimizing tax efficiency to enhance the profitability and sustainability of crypto investments.

As Australians prepare for the forthcoming tax season, leverage Kryptos to stay on top of the latest tax regulations, optimize your crypto investments, and ensure compliance with evolving taxation policies. 

To explore the platform for free, Sign Up Now.

FAQs

1. What are the main changes in the 2023-24 Australian Federal Budget for individual taxpayers?

The budget preserves existing tax rates and thresholds, eliminates LMITO, and announces the implementation of Stage 3 tax cuts from July 1, 2024.

2. How does the new budget affect small businesses in Australia?

Small businesses benefit from the reinstated $20,000 instant asset write-off and a 20% supplementary deduction for energy-efficient assets.

3. What incentives are introduced for property investors in the 2023-24 budget?

The budget introduces an accelerated depreciation rate for build-to-rent projects and reduces withholding tax for managed investment trusts.

4. Are there any changes to superannuation in the 2023-24 Federal Budget?

Tax concessions are reduced for balances above $3 million from July 1, 2025, and employers must sync super payments with salaries from July 1, 2026.

5. How does the new budget impact multinational corporations operating in Australia?

Implementation of OECD/G20 BEPS Project’s Pillar Two solution introduces a 15% minimum tax for certain multinationals from July 1, 2024.

All content on Kryptos serves general informational purposes only. It's not intended to replace any professional advice from licensed accountants, attorneys, or certified financial and tax professionals. The information is completed to the best of our knowledge and we at Kryptos do not claim either correctness or accuracy of the same. Before taking any tax position / stance, you should always consider seeking independent legal, financial, taxation or other advice from the professionals. Kryptos is not liable for any loss caused from the use of, or by placing reliance on, the information on this website. Kryptos disclaims any responsibility for the accuracy or adequacy of any positions taken by you in your tax returns. Thank you for being part of our community, and we're excited to continue guiding you on your crypto journey!

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